Pageturners Book Club

Welcome to the Pageturners Book Club! It is open to all students, faculty, staff, administrators and community friends. The books are available for purchase at the Schoolcraft College Bookstores. Discussion sessions are facilitated by Schoolcraft students.

All Pageturners events are free and open to the public. Due to the COVID pandemic, the book club will be held virtually during the 2021 Fall semester through Blackboard Collaborate. Please come and join us!


Upcoming Book Discussion Events

 

September, 28 2021 – Virtual Book Discussion Notes of a Native Son by James Baldwin

262px-James_Baldwin_Notes_of_a_Native_Son

1:30pm- 2:30pm (virtual book discussion)

In an age of Black Lives Matter, James Baldwin's essays on life in Harlem, the protest novel, movies, and African Americans abroad are as powerful today as when they were first written. With films like I Am Not Your Negro and the forthcoming If Beale Street Could Talk bringing renewed interest to Baldwin's life and work, Notes of a Native Son serves as a valuable introduction.

Written during the 1940s and early 1950s, when Baldwin was only in his twenties, the essays collected in Notes of a Native Son capture a view of black life and black thought at the dawn of the civil rights movement and as the movement slowly gained strength through the words of one of the most captivating essayists and foremost intellectuals of that era. Writing as an artist, activist, and social critic, Baldwin probes the complex condition of being black in America. With a keen eye, he examines everything from the significance of the protest novel to the motives and circumstances of the many black expatriates of the time, from his home in “The Harlem Ghetto” to a sobering “Journey to Atlanta.”

Notes of a Native Son inaugurated Baldwin as one of the leading interpreters of the dramatic social changes erupting in the United States in the twentieth century, and many of his observations have proven almost prophetic. His criticism on topics such as the paternalism of white progressives or on his own friend Richard Wright’s work is pointed and unabashed. He was also one of the few writing on race at the time who addressed the issue with a powerful mixture of outrage at the gross physical and political violence against black citizens and measured understanding of their oppressors, which helped awaken a white audience to the injustices under their noses. Naturally, this combination of brazen criticism and unconventional empathy for white readers won Baldwin as much condemnation as praise.

Notes is the book that established Baldwin’s voice as a social critic, and it remains one of his most admired works. The essays collected here create a cohesive sketch of black America and reveal an intimate portrait of Baldwin’s own search for identity as an artist, as a black man, and as an American.

Join our virtual book discussion through Blackboard Collaborate:

https://us.bbcollab.com/guest/56dd8e40ea5348f3baf4b0253de6fc12

Dial In:

 +1-571-392-7650

PIN: 261 549 3157

 


October, 26 2021 - Virtual Book Discussion Human Rights: A Very Short Introduction by Andrew Clapham

human rights

1:30pm- 2:30pm (virtual book discussion)

Join our virtual book discussion through Blackboard Collaborate:

https://us.bbcollab.com/guest/56dd8e40ea5348f3baf4b0253de6fc12

Dial In:

 +1-571-392-7650

PIN: 261 549 3157


October, 28 2021 – Book Panel Discussion Human Rights: A Very Short Introduction by Andrew Clapham 

1:30pm- 2:30pm (on campus in LA 200)

Today it is usually not long before a problem gets expressed as a human rights issue. Indeed, human rights law continues to gain increasing attention internationally, and must move quickly in order to keep up with a social world that changes so rapidly.

This Very Short Introduction, in its second edition, brings the issue of human rights up to date, considering the current controversies surrounding the movement. Discussing torture and arbitrary detention in the context of counter terrorism, Andrew Clapham also considers new challenges to human rights in the context of privacy, equality and the right to health. Looking at the philosophical justification for rights, the historical origins of human rights and how they are formed in law, Clapham explains what our human rights actually are, what they might be, and where the human rights movement is heading.


November, 16 2021 – Virtual Book Discussion Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End by Atul Gawande

beingmortal

1:30pm- 2:30pm (virtual book discussion)

Medicine has triumphed in modern times, transforming the dangers of childbirth, injury, and disease from harrowing to manageable. But when it comes to the inescapable realities of aging and death, what medicine can do often runs counter to what it should.

Through eye-opening research and gripping stories of his own patients and family, Gawande reveals the suffering this dynamic has produced. Nursing homes, devoted above all to safety, battle with residents over the food they are allowed to eat and the choices they are allowed to make. Doctors, uncomfortable discussing patients' anxieties about death, fall back on false hopes and treatments that are actually shortening lives instead of improving them.

In his bestselling books, Atul Gawande, a practicing surgeon, has fearlessly revealed the struggles of his profession. Here he examines its ultimate limitations and failures―in his own practices as well as others'―as life draws to a close. Riveting, honest, and humane, Being Mortal shows how the ultimate goal is not a good death but a good life―all the way to the very end.

Join our virtual book discussion through Blackboard Collaborate:

https://us.bbcollab.com/guest/56dd8e40ea5348f3baf4b0253de6fc12

Dial In:

 +1-571-392-7650

PIN: 261 549 3157